Wisconsin

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

Wisconsin is one of the six key battleground states that will be most important to winning a progressive majority in 2020. Find out what you can do right now.

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About This State

Badgers, badgers, badgers. Everyone is counting on you this year. We won’t get into why. Water under the bridge. We love you and your Rodgers and your cheese curds -- anything you need this year, you let us know. We’ll come shovel your driveway if it means getting out a few more votes in Waukesha County. In the meantime, here’s what you need to know about voting in Wisconsin this year.

Register To Vote

UPDATE

Wisconsin is mailing absentee ballot applications to all voters because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Any voter can also request an absentee ballot without an excuse online or by mail. If you are requesting an absentee ballot, election officials must receive your application by Oct. 29. Absentee ballots must be signed by a witness, and received by Election Day Nov. 3.

The Supreme Court ruled that ballots postmarked on or before Nov. 3 will only be counted if they are received by November 3rd at 8pm. Return your ballot as early as possible and keep checking the Wisconsin Elections site below.

If you have any problem voting, or witness any voter suppression or intimidation, call 1-608-336-3232.

Wisconsin Election Updates

Why Is This State Special?

Wisconsin broke hearts in 2016 and could be the closest battleground state of all in 2020. While Trump won Wisconsin by less than one point in 2016, Wisconsin Democrats turned it around in 2018 and won the governorship by less than one point. Wisconsin may be a more tough state to win than Pennsylvania or Michigan because it has more rural areas, but the Democratic victories in 2018, combined with a new and improved organizing strategy, could help the party pull out a win in 2020.

ROAD TO WIN

Road to Win

Electoral College Votes

10

Delegates for the DNC

84

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Key Dates

Oct 20 – Nov 1

Early Voting (in-person absentee)

Nov 3

Election Day

What to know before you vote

  • How do I make sure I’m registered?

  • Can I register the same day I want to vote?

    Yes, you can register to vote in-person on Election Day.

  • Can I still vote by mail?

    We’re past the recommended deadline from USPS for voters to send back their ballots to ensure they are delivered by Election Day. If you still have your mail ballot, drop it off in person.

    A voter can hand deliver an absentee ballot they received by mail to the clerk. Ballots can be returned to the clerk’s office, an early voting site, or the voter’s polling place on election day. Municipal Clerks can also establish ballot drop boxes to accept absentee ballots, but local options vary, so make sure to contact your Municipal Clerk to find out your return options. A family member or another person may also return the ballot on behalf of the voter. Voters who received their ballot by mail and do not have access to a witness could potentially appear at the clerk’s office or in-person absentee site to vote their ballot and have the clerk or clerk staff serve as a witness for the voter. The deadline for voters to return their ballot is 8pm on Election Day.

    Learn more
  • How do I return my ballot and how do I make sure it’s counted?

    When filling out your ballot, double-check the instructions to make sure you fill out the ballot correctly. Check if your ballot requires using a pen with black or blue ink, a signature on the envelope, any witness requirements and postage, if necessary. We’re past the recommended deadline from USPS for voters to send back their ballots to ensure they are delivered by Election Day. If you still have your mail ballot, drop it off in person.

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  • Does my state require my ballot to be postmarked or delivered by Election Day?

    Your ballot must be received by 8:00 PM local time on Election Day. If you still have your mail ballot, drop it off in person as soon as possible.

  • Can I track my ballot?

    Yep, you can do so below.

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  • What if I requested a vote by mail ballot but I decide I want to vote in person instead?

    According to Wisconsin Elections Commission, “Voters who’ve received an absentee ballot will have a watermark on their name in the poll book indicating an absentee ballot has been issued, prompting poll workers to ask them if they’ve already returned their absentee ballot. As long as the answer is no, the voter can vote. If the voter has already returned her ballot, that will also be noted on the poll book, and the poll workers will not issue a new ballot."

  • What if I still haven't received my ballot?

    At this point, you should vote early in-person through Nov. 1, or cast your ballot in-person on Election Day. Find your polling place below.

    You can vote early in Wisconsin by completing an absentee ballot in-person at your local municipal clerk's office from Tuesday, Oct. 20 to Sunday, Nov. 1. If you apply for an absentee ballot in your municipal clerk's office, or another designated location for in-person absentee voting, you will vote your ballot immediately in the clerk's office, seal your ballot in the proper envelope, and return it to a member of the clerk's staff. You will need to show your acceptable photo ID for voting when voting by in-person absentee ballot. To find the dates and hours for in-person absentee voting where you live, contact your municipal clerk, or visit myvote.wi.gov to find your polling place.

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  • Can I vote early in person?

    You can vote early in Wisconsin by completing an absentee ballot in-person at your local municipal clerk's office from Tuesday, Oct. 20 to Sunday, Nov. 1. If you apply for an absentee ballot in your municipal clerk's office, or another designated location for in-person absentee voting, you will vote your ballot immediately in the clerk's office, seal your ballot in the proper envelope, and return it to a member of the clerk's staff. You will need to show your acceptable photo ID for voting when voting by in-person absentee ballot. To find the dates and hours for in-person absentee voting where you live, contact your municipal clerk, or visit myvote.wi.gov to find your polling place.

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  • What if I’m voting in-person on Election Day?

    Find your polling place below.

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  • Do I need an ID to vote in person?

    Yes, yes you do. A state driver's license, state ID card, military ID card, US passport, tribal ID, certificate of naturalization, state accredited college ID with signature, or a receipt from the DMV saying your petition for an ID is in process -- all of those would work. Check for updates and learn more about your state's voter ID laws below.

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  • How do I find out where to go to vote?

    Make a plan, below!

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MAKE A PLAN

Whether you’re voting by mail or in person, what’s important is making a plan to do it as early as possible.

WHAT’S ON MY BALLOT?

Use our voter guide to see who and what will be on the ballot when you vote. States are finalizing who and what are on your ballot this year. You can use this tool to check and see if your ballot is available. Your full ballot will be available by October 8.

Races To Watch

  • House

Resources

  • If you run into any issues while voting, call 1-833-DEM-VOTE (1-833-336-8683), a voter hotline is monitored 24/7/365 with voting experts who are ready to field questions pertaining to felon disenfranchisement, voter purging, poll worker misconduct, voter machines, accessibility, and more.

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  • Need to show Voter ID? Not sure what kind? Get the specifics in your state here.

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  • The Wisconsin Progressive Voters Guide compiles the information that allows you to make informed decisions about the races on your ballot, based on your values.

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